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Andrew Mitchell in £80,000 libel payout t0    ‘plebgate’  PC

The police officer at the centre of the “plebgate” row has accepted £80,000 in damages from Conservative MP Andrew Mitchell.

A judge ruled last year the MP probably had called PC Toby Rowland, an officer on duty at Downing Street’s gates, a “pleb”.

Mr Mitchell accepted using bad language but said he had not used that word.

The ex-chief whip has already paid £300,000 in legal costs to the Sun newspaper and the Police Federation.

He lost a high-profile action against News Group Newspapers, publishers of the Sun, in November.

A judge said he had reached the “firm conclusion” that Mr Mitchell had used the “politically toxic” word “pleb” in September 2012 when he was not allowed to cycle through the main Downing Street vehicle gates.

PC Rowland’s lawyer, Jeremy Clarke-Williams, told Mr Justice Warby that since that judgement Mr Mitchell “has abandoned the other defences he had raised to my client’s claim and consequently terms of settlement have been agreed”.

The solicitor added: “The payment of £80,000 damages by Mr Mitchell sets the seal on PC Rowland’s vindication, as well as providing compensation for the injury to his reputation and the distress caused to him and his family over many months.

“PC Rowland never felt that the events in Downing Street were anything more than a minor incident.

“He was not responsible for the publicity which followed and would have much preferred that the whole matter had never entered the public domain.

“He now simply wishes to be left in peace to continue his police career.”

Neither Mr Mitchell nor PC Rowland was in court.

‘Great distress’

The row centres on a 15-second confrontation between Mr Mitchell and PC Rowland, after the then cabinet minister was refused permission to cycle through the main gates at Downing Street.

The story was splashed across the front page of The Sun, which said the chief whip swore at the officers and called them “plebs” who should learn their place.

Mr Mitchell admitted swearing but denied using the word “pleb”.

He was forced to resign from the cabinet but vowed to clear his name in the libel courts, launching an action against The Sun.

PC Rowland then launched a libel action against Mr Mitchell, claiming that his reputation has been damaged by the MP’s remarks and that he suffered “great distress, humiliation and upset”.

In November 2014, Mr Justice Mitting ruled that Mitchell probably did call police officers “plebs”

Weighing up the competing claims, the judge said PC Rowland was “not the sort of man who would have had the wit, imagination or inclination to invent on the spur of the moment an account of what a senior politician had said to him in temper”.

Officer jailed

He added that gaps and inconsistencies in PC Rowland’s account did not demonstrate he had fabricated his account, as Mr Mitchell’s lawyers claimed.

The judge ordered Mr Mitchell to pay interim costs of £300,000 but the total legal bill he will face is not yet known.

A Scotland Yard diplomatic protection officer has been jailed for 12 months after admitting lying about the “plebgate” incident.

Keith Wallis falsely claimed in an email to his MP, the Conservative deputy chief whip John Randall, that he had witnessed the confrontation.

Wallis and three other members of the Metropolitan Police’s elite diplomatic protection squad have been sacked for gross misconduct in relation to the “plebgate” incident and its subsequent leaking to the press.

Separately, the Independent Police Complaints Commission, has launched an investigation into three officers – one each from from the Warwickshire, West Mercia and West Midlands forces – over an account they gave of a meeting with Mr Mitchell at the height of the affair.

Andrew Mitchell in £80,000 libel payout to ‘plebgate’ PC

Andrew MitchellImage copyrightAP
Image captionAndrew Mitchell denies using the word “pleb”

The police officer at the centre of the “plebgate” row has accepted £80,000 in damages from Conservative MP Andrew Mitchell.

A judge ruled last year the MP probably had called PC Toby Rowland, an officer on duty at Downing Street’s gates, a “pleb”.

Mr Mitchell accepted using bad language but said he had not used that word.

The ex-chief whip has already paid £300,000 in legal costs to the Sun newspaper and the Police Federation.

He lost a high-profile action against News Group Newspapers, publishers of the Sun, in November.

A judge said he had reached the “firm conclusion” that Mr Mitchell had used the “politically toxic” word “pleb” in September 2012 when he was not allowed to cycle through the main Downing Street vehicle gates.

PC Rowland’s lawyer, Jeremy Clarke-Williams, told Mr Justice Warby that since that judgement Mr Mitchell “has abandoned the other defences he had raised to my client’s claim and consequently terms of settlement have been agreed”.

The solicitor added: “The payment of £80,000 damages by Mr Mitchell sets the seal on PC Rowland’s vindication, as well as providing compensation for the injury to his reputation and the distress caused to him and his family over many months.

“PC Rowland never felt that the events in Downing Street were anything more than a minor incident.

“He was not responsible for the publicity which followed and would have much preferred that the whole matter had never entered the public domain.

“He now simply wishes to be left in peace to continue his police career.”

Neither Mr Mitchell nor PC Rowland was in court.

‘Great distress’

The row centres on a 15-second confrontation between Mr Mitchell and PC Rowland, after the then cabinet minister was refused permission to cycle through the main gates at Downing Street.

The story was splashed across the front page of The Sun, which said the chief whip swore at the officers and called them “plebs” who should learn their place.

Mr Mitchell admitted swearing but denied using the word “pleb”.

He was forced to resign from the cabinet but vowed to clear his name in the libel courts, launching an action against The Sun.

PC Rowland then launched a libel action against Mr Mitchell, claiming that his reputation has been damaged by the MP’s remarks and that he suffered “great distress, humiliation and upset”.

In November 2014, Mr Justice Mitting ruled that Mitchell probably did call police officers “plebs”

Weighing up the competing claims, the judge said PC Rowland was “not the sort of man who would have had the wit, imagination or inclination to invent on the spur of the moment an account of what a senior politician had said to him in temper”.

Officer jailed

He added that gaps and inconsistencies in PC Rowland’s account did not demonstrate he had fabricated his account, as Mr Mitchell’s lawyers claimed.

The judge ordered Mr Mitchell to pay interim costs of £300,000 but the total legal bill he will face is not yet known.

A Scotland Yard diplomatic protection officer has been jailed for 12 months after admitting lying about the “plebgate” incident.

Keith Wallis falsely claimed in an email to his MP, the Conservative deputy chief whip John Randall, that he had witnessed the confrontation.

Wallis and three other members of the Metropolitan Police’s elite diplomatic protection squad have been sacked for gross misconduct in relation to the “plebgate” incident and its subsequent leaking to the press.

Separately, the Independent Police Complaints Commission, has launched an investigation into three officers – one each from from the Warwickshire, West Mercia and West Midlands forces – over an account they gave of a meeting with Mr Mitchell at the height of the affair.

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2) +Interview Gavin Capps academic on S.A + mines

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investec+lonmin mines
Nelson Mandella and the ANC.
Mandela’s links-views mines- nada?/ coercion politicians SA
Rolihlahla Mandella was born in Transkei, South Africa o n July 18 th 1918. The name Rolihlahla translates as ‘troublemaker’ but little did anyone know what a profound effect his name would have on the world. Mandella’s father Hendry Mphakanyiswa of the Tembu Tribe was set to become a chief but lost his status and fortune over an argument with a local colonial magistrate.
Mandella went on to be baptised in the Methodist Church and consequently became the first of his family to attend school. It was also at this time he was given the name Nelson.
Mandella decided he wanted to fight for anti-colonial politics in his 20s,and he joined the African National Congress (ANC) in 1942. He became a founding member of the African National Congress Youth League (ANCYL). In 1949, the ANCYLs methods of; boycott, civil disobedience and non-cooperation replaced the polite manner of the ANC in opposition tothe National Party’s apartheid policies. The objective was to gain full citizenship, redistribution of land and free education to all people of South Africa.
The racist policies of the South African government were continually fought by Mandella. The defiance campaign in 1951 aimed toget citizens involved in non-cooperation of unjust and discriminatory laws. It stated that all people […] irrespective of the colour of their skin, who have made South Africa their home, are entitled to live a full and free life.
The pacifism of the ANC caused many followers to lose faith, and Mandella also
began to think that a more forceful approach would be needed to achieve change.
In 1961, Mandella co-founded the Umkhonto we Sizwe which was an
armed wing of the ANC. They publicly stated they would retaliate
with force towards the government if no action was taken to end apartheid.The Umkhontowe Sizwe was quickly branded a terrorist group by the South African government. Mandella’s involvement in this group was well documented and in 1961 he ordered a three day national workers strike, for which he was arrested and sentenced to five years’ imprisonment.
In 1963 Mandella and 10 other ANC leaders were placed on trial for
crimes against the state. At the beginning of the Rivonia Tria
l, Mandella chose to make a speech instead of testifying. He said
I have cherished the ideal of a democratic and free society in which all persons live together in harmony and with equal opportunities. It is an idea which I hope to live fo
r and achieve. But if needs be, it is an ideal for which I am prepared to die.
Mandella was sentenced to 27 years imprisonment. During this time he refused to abandon his political ideals in return for his freedom, and throughout this time his reputation grew with the anti-apartheid movement.He was released from prison in 1990 and continued his political fight. In 1994he took up negotiations with the president F. W. de Klerk to abolish apartheid and establish multiracial elections. He led the ANC to victory
and consequentlybecame South Africa’s first black president at the age of 77.
Mandella declined to run for a second term and instead embarked on a life of charitable work. The Nelson Mandella Foundation was set up to help the fight towards world poverty and HIV/AIDS. After a long perio d of illness, Mandella died of a respiratory infection on 5
th December 2013 at the age of 95. Mandella will be remembered around the world for his sacrifices, especially inSouth Africa where he is affectionately referred to as
Tata meaning Father.

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